38 thoughts on “Ruination in Bloom – Charles Schneider

  1. Over 70 pages, plus four pull-out artwork pages.
    Highly luxurious and stylishly designed book that I estimate to be about five inches square.
    My copy numbered 5/85.
    Appears to have about 36 poems that I intend to comment upon as I read them.

  2. SLIPCASE EDITION
    “a) One day this book you hold might be slipcased…”

    AMONGST THE ELMS
    “ensuring years in madness’ bind?”

    These first two poems – with a select line from each shown above that make some sense together?
    A yearning for a place between madness and sanity that shares the characteristics of neither. Death and life, too, smelt he.

  3. UNHEARD PROPHECY

    “war
    upon The Mundane, the Known, All Enemies
    of the Grotesque.”

    Exactly the warcry of the complete produce of the grand romanic hermitage?
    Meanwhile, please let it be taken as read that I anticipate all these poems will be darkly allusive, elusive, delusive, collusive, illusive, and more … like this one.
    Live a day a day to put a poem in, till my Kingdom Come.

  4. CAVERNS OF FEAR

    A striking rhyme-poem, in-your-face Ligottianism, and the only way to do justice to it would be to quote it all here!
    To be read aloud and, if this were a just world, it is a poem that would be passed down the generations as a gem of the human condition, if such generations themselves still passed themselves down or, instead, dug themselves deeper, once having read this poem.

  5. THE RUSTY PEACOCK

    “Cobbles of the homespun.
    where they all turn…”

    A strange inchoately sumptuous ditty, a Proustian scene viewed by whatever image of diurnal self you have: be you monstrous, human, avian, whatever…

  6. LITANY OF HATE

    A poignantly defiant need to grapple with this prose as tortured into verse
    to be able to empathise with hating someone you once loved
    for their becoming a dream-puppet in death?

  7. BLACK GRAIL

    “It is a film so simultaneously beautiful
    yet appalling that it simply cannot be endured.
    This aesthetic ruination,…”

    You can sense the poet whittling away at the words in the basement of this powerful poem.

  8. LORD BLOODVINE’S FOLLY
    FROM:
    PHANTASIES JOLLY
    PRIVATELY PRINTED FOR R____ C____
    QUEBEC
    1793

    “Tarie tots do slip the sheets”

    A nursery rhyme based on history, I guess, and it is just as good as the famous nursery rhymes of my childhood also based on history.

  9. THE VIOLET EYE OF EUPHASTUS
    THURNLEY, PART SEVENTEEN

    From nonsense Nursery Rhymes to real no-nonsense unadulterated adult darkness, a transition well conveyed, but disguised or disarmed by its apparent nonsense of a title.

  10. A SUNSPOT

    From the various tantalising clues, I suspect this poem is really an old photo from the fin de siecle bringing to new life a distant to-be-loved relative. Why a sunspot? That’s the most tantalising thing of all.

  11. THE OPIATES FROM MORNOLOC
    an affectation

    “Her Angel she saw in a cobalt block”

    A corn loom of a poem, with the pretentious affectation of believing it would be read and enjoyed by someone with the time and desire to do so on Christmas Day. Someone who would also make sense of it.

  12. THE DEAD I LOVED

    “Bury me with my rarest books,”

    Rusty dreams, rusty being embedded in rarest and bury.
    This is a poem continuing this book that is making me fall in love all over again with poetry.

  13. UNFINISHED POEM

    “Story-boarding his life gave him more pleasure
    than living it.”

    It is perhaps ironic that, as far as I remember, this witty poem is the longest one so far in this book.
    And it’s also telling that my life is almost certain to end when I am still partway through a real-time review of a book as I am always in this state of literary incompletion,

  14. THE KNOCK

    “You build a tombstone each day you live”

    A wise poem about life against monuments, perhaps tongue in cheek, but exhilarating. But then I thought of that dead monument to once ancient hope.

  15. HOW TO MAKE A GHOST

    “You walk backwards, you daydream at night,”

    Unmooring as one’s own ghost ship, towards death as delirium – or joy.
    Some more haunting phrases here, making me think that writing is a form of a haunting, when done well,

  16. WILL OATHS OF LOVE

    “Is it not wiser to cut holes in misshapen
    traveling bags?”

    Probably the most allusive, elusive, illusive trail of images and emotions leading like Hansel and Gretel’s crumbs to the home in the heart. Or sand in a timer.

  17. AT WHAT POINT

    Was this whole exercise necessary?
    I hope not.
    This poem implies that only the unnecessary is necessary.
    I wish I had known that all those weeks ago.
    This is the perfect unnecessary poetry book and I recommend it to those of us who have found themselves coming over all unnecessary.
    The book’s excellent design and pull-out artwork notwithstanding.

    “At what point was my madness assured?”
    On page 36, I suggest, where it mentions BRAIN SANDWICHES.

    end

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