The Virtual Tablet of Irma Tre by Marie Lecrivain

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A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

The Virtual Tablet of Irma Tre explores the correlation between poetry and alchemy through a series of alphabetized poetic vignettes, and evocative photography. Additionally, the poems of this collective speak directly to the reader’s past, present, and future selves. Exploring the idea of reincarnation, Lecrivain expresses the importance of evolving the Self for a greater good through catharsis and cognizance.

The Virtual Tablet of Irma Tre” it was published by Edgar & Lenore’s Publishing House (2014).

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.

Mirrors in the Deluge

Mirrors in the Deluge

A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

Mirrors in the Deluge is a collection of 32 unrelated stories that take elements from fantasy, science fiction, horror and other genres and give them a lateral shift. Like much of Rhys’ work these quirky tales between them encompass parody, pastiche and puns. The fun, as ever, starts with the title of each story – gently leading an unsuspecting reader into preconceived ideas and expectations; expectations that are soon spun around, turned on their head (or other extremities), and pushed in an unexpected direction. Thus, even a saunter through the contents page is already a hugely entertaining experience and one more akin to savouring the hors d’oeuvres of a grand banquet than consulting a list of shortcuts into a literary tome.
# quote from http://elsewhen.alnpetepress.co.uk

Mirrors in the Deluge by Rhys Hughes ” it was published by Elsewhen Press.

I will do soon a gastronomic review.

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.

Terror Tales of London

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A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

The city of London – whose gold-paved streets are lost in choking fog and echo to the trundling of plague-carts, whose twisting back alleys ring to cries of “Murder!”, whose awful tower is stained with the blood of princes and paupers alike.
The night stalker of Hammersmith
The brutal butchery of Holborn
The depraved spirit of Sydenham
The fallen angel of Dalston
The murder den of Notting Hill
The haunted sewer of Bermondsey
The red-eyed ghoul of Highgate
And many more chilling tales from Adam Nevill, Mark Morris, Christopher Fowler, Nina Allen, Nicholas Royle, and other award-winning masters and mistresses of the macabre.
# quote from http://www.grayfriarpress.com/

Terror Tales of London edited by Paul Finch” it was published by Gray Friar Press.

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.

The Wanderer by Timothy J. Jarvis

A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

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After obscure author of strange stories, Simon Peterkin, vanishes in bizarre circumstances, a typescript, of a text entitled, ‘The Wanderer’, is found in his flat. ‘The Wanderer’ is a weird document. On a dying Earth, in the far-flung future, a man, an immortal, types the tale of his aeon-long life as prey, as a hunted man; he tells of his quitting the Himalayas, his sanctuary for thousands of years, to return to his birthplace, London, to write the memoirs; and writes, also, of the night he learned he was cursed with life without cease, an evening in a pub in that city, early in the twenty-first century, a gathering to tell of eldritch experiences undergone. Is ‘The Wanderer’ a fiction, perhaps Peterkin’s last novel, or something far stranger? Perhaps more ‘account’ than ‘story’?

The Wanderer is the first novel by Timothy J. Jarvis and published by Perfect Edge (2014).

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.

Unpleasant Tales by Brendan Connell

A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

Unpleasant Tales

From the comic to the shocking, from the refined to the visceral, and blurring the boundaries between all four – Unpleasant Tales is a remarkable new collection of some of Brendan Connell’s darkest stories. Drenched in gluttony and decadence and with a scope stretching from the depravity of rulers in ancient Greece and Renaissance Spain, to phantasmagorical body alteration in Zürich and New York, these are supremely refined and elegant, creepily intelligent and, of course, exquisitely unpleasant stories that pack a tremendous punch, both individually and collectively. Stories that will not easily be forgotten.
# quote from http://www.eibonvalepress.co.uk

Unpleasant Tales by Brendan Connell” it was published by Eibonvale Press.

It features 22 stories.

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.

Caledonia Dreamin’ – Strange Fiction of Scottish Descent

A real-time review by Paulo Brito.

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Glaikit, mockit, droukit, drouthy, couthy, scunner, thrawn – the Scots language is rich with words too gallus not to glory in, dialect terms that deserve better than to be boxed away as precious oddities. Here we’ve collected some of the strangest writers of Scottish descent to bring these terms to life – that’s Scottish by heritage or residence, adoption or initiation…

An anthology is only a good anthology if the stories that comprise it are balanced. If the quality of each story is more alternate than the electric charge, that anthology loses its value. And to achieve a uniform quality depends on both the writers / stories chosen as the theme that unites them. “Caledonia Dreamin’ – Strange Fiction of Scottish Descent“, edited by Hal Duncan and Chris Kelso, has a very interesting and challenging premise (“Our aim here has been to mine the language for its wealth, tasking writers to draw out of it whatever gem of a word caught their eye and to build a story around it in celebration, to stake a place for these words in the wider culture, beyond their usual confines.” page 11), but which may prove to be complicated to attain such uniformity.

Caledonia Dreamin’ – Strange Fiction of Scottish Descent” it was published by Eibonvale Press.

I features stories by: Neil Williamson, Wendy Muzlanova, Brian Milton, T.J. Berg, Douglas Thompson, Preston Grassman, Tom Bradley, Rob McClure Smith, Angus McAllister, Nick Mamatas, Gavin Grant, Phil Raines, Kirsty Logan, David McGroarty, Gio Clairval, Tim Jarvis and Anna Tambour.

I will do a real-time review of this book – yes I am crazy.
If I can get do a review 10% similar to one of Des Lewis I will be a very happy person. I know that will be a very hard objective to accomplish; I already say that I live surround by madness?

This real-time review will appear, as and when I read it, in the thought stream found below or by clicking on the title of this post.